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    Archaeological Headlines - Archaeology Magazine

  • Roman Gold Coin Discovered on Island of Alderney
    BAILIWICK OF GUERNSEY, CHANNEL ISLANDS—A gold coin has been discovered at a Roman site on the island of Alderney, according to a BBC News report. The coin has been dated to the fourth century A.D., during the reign of the emperor Valens, who ruled from A.D. 364 to 378. Archaeologist...
  • Revolutionary War Barracks Found in Virginia
    WILLIAMSBURG, VIRGINIA—WAVY 10 reports that traces of a barracks dated to the Revolutionary War period have been found near the visitor center at Colonial Williamsburg. Historic maps and documents indicate that the barracks was constructed between 1776 and 1777 to house up to 2,000 soldiers and 100 horses on an area...
  • Project Maps Possible Path of Lost Nile River Branch
    WILMINGTON, NORTH CAROLINA—According to a Cosmos Magazine report, geomorphologist Eman Ghoneim of the University of Carolina Wilmington and her colleagues have found evidence of a 40-mile-long branch of the Nile River that flowed some 4,700 years ago along the western banks of the modern Nile. The evidence was collected through...
  • 1,800-Year-Old Tombs Excavated in Eastern China
    RIZHAO, CHINA—The Miami Herald reports that three tombs have been discovered inside a partially damaged burial mound near the coast of eastern China by researchers from the Chinese Academy of Social Sciences. Each of the tombs, which have been dated to the Han Dynasty (206 B.C.–A.D. 220), has a sloping...
  • Hair Analysis Hints at Beethoven’s Health Status
    BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS—According to a Live Science report, analysis of two hair samples attributed to Ludwig van Beethoven by a team of researchers including Nader Fifai of Boston Children’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School and William Meredith of San José State University has detected high levels of heavy metals, including lead,...
  • New Thoughts on Decline of Roman Town in Egypt
    ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN—According to a Newsweek report, Laura Motta of the University of Michigan and her colleagues radiocarbon dated plant remains recovered from the site of Karanis and found that this Roman agricultural settlement in Egypt's Fayum Oasis was probably abandoned later than previously thought. Thousands of people are thought...
  • Endurance Running May Have Helped Prehistoric Hunters
    ONTARIO, CANADA—Science Magazine reports that archaeologist Eugène Morin of Trent University, behavioral ecologist Bruce Winterhalder of University of California, Davis, and their colleagues reviewed historic accounts written by travelers, explorers, and missionaries for information about persistence hunting, the practice of chasing prey at a run over long distances. The researchers...
  • Underground Anomaly Detected in Giza’s Western Cemetery
    CAIRO, EGYPT—An L-shaped structure was detected using ground-penetrating radar and electrical resistivity tomography about six feet beneath Giza’s Western Cemetery by a team of scientists from Tohoku University, Higashi Nippon International University, and Egypt’s National Research Institute of Astronomy and Geophysics, according to a Live Science report. During the Old...
  • Indoor Pool Uncovered at Roman Villa in Albania
    DURRËS, ALBANIA—According to a Miami Herald report, an indoor pool has been uncovered at a Roman villa located near western Albania’s Adriatic coastline. Researchers from Albania’s National Institute of Cultural Heritage said that the 1,600-year-old rectangular pool is decorated with well-preserved mosaics. Two shallow bathtubs coated with waterproof mortar were...
  • Unusual Ancient Burial in Austria Reevaluated
    VIENNA, AUSTRIA—According to a Live Science report, radiocarbon dating and the analysis of DNA samples taken from the remains of two people buried in the same grave with a horse some 1,800 years ago in northern Austria reveals that they were first-degree relatives—either mother and daughter or sisters. It had...
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